Archive for the 'Alternative First Aid' Category

Natural Antiseptic Medicines

Author: Dr. Larita
September 21, 2015

I used to purchase over the counter antiseptic creams for my family’s cuts and bruises. When I first heard about using lavender or tea tree essential oil for the same purpose, I was skeptical but I purchased the essential oils anyway. Then, one day my middle daughter got a scrape on her leg and I was out of antiseptic cream so I used both lavender and tea tree essential oils on the area. The lavender calmed her down and she stopped crying quickly and returned to playing with her sisters.

My girls had a ritual whenever a band-aid was necessary. We had to look at the sore place every day until it was healed. I would apply more antiseptic and they would get a nice new child friendly band aid. I was pleasantly surprised by how quickly the sore spot healed when we used the lavender and tea tree essential oil.

I tried the lavender and the tea tree separately on different occasions and both work equally well. I never purchase over the counter antibiotic or antiseptic medications any more because they contain extra ingredients that I don’t believe are necessary. I can use the essence of flowers and plants with the same or even better antiseptic, antibiotic, and anti-fungal properties. The essential oils are all natural and contain no questionable ingredients.


I rubbed my index finger on the top heating element of the oven when I reached in to take out some chocolate chip cookies I was baking for my grandchildren. I didn’t say a bad word but I did yell and almost dropped the cookies. I usually put aloe vera juice directly from the plant on burns but my grandkids watered my plant to death and I had given it to my neighbor to nurse back to health (because I definitely do not have a green thumb.) My husband swears by lavender essential oil for everything from bruises to cuts to burns so I put lavender on the burn and hoped for the best.

This was a really bad burn because when I jumped I also rubbed the skin against the metal bracket holding the heating element and tore the burned flesh. I put two to three drops of lavender oil neat (no carrier oil) on the burn 2 to 3 times a day and it was healed in a week.  You can barely see where the injury was and it is still fading.


What do you do when your child or grandchild gets a little scratch or scrape and comes running to you crying? Well, I just kiss it, wipe away the tears, and together we go to “doctor it up” with a non-stinging first aid solution for minor cuts and bruises.

Let your child help and learn first aid. Saturate a cotton ball with witch hazel and one to two drops of lavender essential oil. Gently wipe the affected area and add a fun band-aid. This will take their mind off the boo-boo and the lavender will calm them down and kill the germs.

An even faster method is to pre-blend the witch hazel in a one-ounce bottle and add five to six drops of lavender essential oil. Shake the bottle before use to mix the ingredients. The next time your youngster gets a minor injury, you’ll already have a liquid first aid concoction on hand and the child can shake it up and put it on the cotton ball. The crying will stop in no time!


The most effective aromatherapy essential oils are broad-acting and can be used for a variety of symptoms so you don’t have to take a lot of them with you when you travel. Collecting your essential oil travel kit can be simple, inexpensive, and aromatic. Using eucalyptus essential oil for respiration; tea tree essential oil for first aid; rosemary essential oil for stimulation; peppermint essential oil for digestion; and lavender essential oil for soothing sedation – you can treat just about any ailment that might occur while you are away.

  • To treat nausea and motion sickness, use a blend of one drop each rosemary and peppermint essential oils on a handkerchief and inhale the aroma.
  • To calm travel anxiety and help you sleep, take a whiff of lavender straight from the bottle!
  • For trouble sleeping, sprinkle a few drops of lavender essential oil on your pillow. Add a few drops of lavender and peppermint to a hot bath to help you settle down or apply a warm compress of lavender to the forehead or chest.
  • To treat aches and pains from traveling, blend rosemary, peppermint, and eucalyptus essential oils in a carrier oil like almond oil, jojoba oil or shea oil to use as a rub for sore muscles and limbs.
  • To treat a sprain or similar injury, use the RICE method – Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation combined with a gentle massage using rosemary essential oil diluted in almond or comparable carrier oil.

OK, I am doing laundry so I’ll have enough clean underwear for the trip so I will continue this blog tomorrow. This will give you time to find a nice small bag to carry your essential oils and carrier oils with you.


Essential Oil First Aid

Author: Dr. Larita
February 5, 2015

Every home has a first aid kit but there is an alternative, have you ever thought about assembling your own aromatherapy essential oil first aid kit? All you need is a good container marked Essential Oils, Alternative First Aid, or Aromatherapy to house the kit and keep your oils away from light, dampness and extreme heat so they don’t deteriorate. The three major oils to stash in your kit are Eucalyptus, Lavender, and Tea Tree Oil.

These three oils will aid with colds, wounds, burns, bruises, insect bites, muscle pain, fungal infections and much more. They can be dispensed in a number of ways depending on the need including directly from the bottle, in a carrier or base oil, in a steam bath, or on a compress. We will continue with more information about your aromatherapy essential oil first aid kit as well as a few more essential oils to add to your stash in another post.


How to Use a Hot Compress

Author: Dr. Larita
August 19, 2014

hot compressYesterday we talked about using cold compresses so today we’ll discuss using hot compresses. Use a hot compress to draw out infection from cuts and wounds. The water in the bowl for a hot compress should be hot but not intolerable to the touch. Put the essential oil drops onto the water’s surface and then lay the piece of cloth over the oils as described for cold water compresses. Immediately remove the cloth and gently wring it out. Place the hot compress to the wounded area for about 20 minutes. Repeat the process 2 or 3 times in a row to draw out the infection. Again, if the injury is acute, seek medical attention. Below are some essential oil blends that will work well for hot compresses.

Synergistic Blends for Hot Compresses

  • For grazes and scratches: 3 drops tea tree and 3 drops frankincense
  • For deep infected cuts: 3 drops myrrh and 3 drops manuka
  • For boils or infected pimples: 3 drops bergamot and 3 drops ravensara


How to Use a Cold Compress

Author: Dr. Larita
August 18, 2014

cold compressYou can use a hot or cold compress to treat such minor injuries as sprains, muscle strains, cuts and grazes. A compress is a few drops of essential oil placed on a cold or warm damp cloth to treat an injury. Simply use a piece of cloth like a muslin square or even a clean dish towel along with a medium sized bowl filled with cold or hot water depending on whether you want a hot or cold compress. Put up to 6 drops of the essential oil of your choice in the water so that it soaks up the essential oils (see below.)

Use a cold compress for sprained ankles or pulled muscles. After you add the oil to the water surface, lay your cloth on the water to soak up the oils without dipping it into the water. This will allow the cloth to soak up the oil and also dilute it somewhat. You can add ice to the water to help reduce swelling and inflammation plus sooth away pain. Wring out the cloth gently and then place it on the injury. Keep the injured area raised with the compress in place for at least 20 minutes.

If your injury isn’t too bad, use the cold compress  process at least 3 times total for relief. If the  injury is acute, please seek medical advice. The cold compress can be in place until you are able to get to the doctor. Below are some some essential oil blends for cold compresses.

Synergistic Blends for Cold Compresses

  • To relieve muscular pain: 3 drops chamomile and 3 drops lavender
  • To cool and calm inflammation: 3 drops peppermint and 3 drops yarrow
  • To ease pulled muscles: 3 drops chamomile and 3 drops marjoram

More tomorrow on how to use a compress

 


Some of you will be traveling with children and you will need your aromatherapy essential oil travel kit to treat some of the following symptoms:

Headaches: for stress headaches, rub the temples with one drop of rosemary essential oil and at the same time, slowly sip 1/2 glass of water with 1 additional drop of rosemary oil added. Another treatment for headaches is to apply a warm compress to which you’ve added 1 drop of eucalyptus and 1 drop of peppermint essential oils.

Stomach aches: to relieve stomach or bowel distress, add 1 drop of peppermint essential oil to a glass of water, blend well and sip slowly until it is all gone. If vomiting is involved, increase the peppermint oil to two drops and also apply a compress of rosemary oil to the forehead and the stomach.

Respiratory congestion: to relieve respiratory congestion, add a few drops of eucalyptus essential oil to a hot bath and breath deeply while soaking in the tub. Most hotels and motels are equipped with a microwave oven so you can give yourself or your loved one a steam treatment by boiling two cups of water and pouring it into a bowl. Let it sit for a few minutes and then add 2 to 4 drops of eucalyptus oil. Sit over the bowl,  cover your head with a towel, and breath to loosen mucous. Continue this method for 5 to 10 minutes taking breaks as needed. For sinus congestion, you can use eucalyptus, peppermint and lavender oils alternately as a steam treatment and you can add a few drops to a handkerchief and inhale it throughout the day.

Colds and fever: I often develop a cold when I’ve been cooped up in an airplane and if this happens to you, treat it by inhaling a blend of peppermint, tea tree, rosemary, and eucalyptus essential oils. You can also blend these oils in a carrier oil and apply them to your chest with a warm compress. Don’t forget to drink lots of liquids, take vitamin C and get lots of rest.

Skin problems: to treat cuts and scrapes, insect stings or bites, bruises and rashes, wash the area first and then use tea tree oil neat or blended in a carrier oil. If the problem is sunburn, add 1 to 2 drops each of tea tree and peppermint essential oils to 1/2 teaspoon of shea butter creamn  and smooth over the effected area.

Have fun on your trip but always be prepared and carry along your essential oil travel kit.


What do you do when your child or grandchild gets a little scratch or scrape and comes running to you crying? Well, I just kiss it, wipe away the tears, and together we go to “doctor it up” with a non-stinging first aid solution for minor cuts and bruises.

Let your child help and learn first aid. Saturate a cotton ball with witch hazel and one to two drops of lavender essential oil. Gently wipe the affected area and add a fun band-aid. This will take their mind off the boo-boo and the lavender will calm them down and kill the germs.

An even faster method is to pre-blend the witch hazel in a one-ounce bottle and add five to six drops of lavender essential oil. Shake the bottle before use to mix the ingredients. The next time your youngster gets a minor injury, you’ll already have a liquid first aid concoction on hand and the child can shake it up and put it on the cotton ball. The crying will stop in no time.


Alternative First Aid 2

Author: Dr. Larita
September 16, 2013

Therapeutic grade essential oils are mainly concentrated herbs and people are missing out on their health benefits because of the misconception that they are only for elevating mood and to use as perfume oils. Numerous essential oils also have properties that kill germs, purify the air and much more. They can be used as alternative first aid care for everything from acne to urinary infections.

If you would like to add additional essential oils to the basic three we discussed in the previous post, you may wish to include rosemary, peppermint, orange, geranium and lemon. Your Aromatherapy First Aid Kit should also include carrier oils such as almond oil, jojoba oil, and or shea oil to mix your essential oils in, plus aloe vera, vitamin E and garlic oil, which can be created by mixing garlic cloves with sweet almond or grape seed oil.


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