Archive for August, 2011

Tea Tree Oil

Author: Dr. Larita
08/25/2011

Deb and I were discussing the band aid on her finger one morning and she told me she had gone to the doctor because her finger was infected at the site of a hang-nail. He suggested she purchase tea tree oil to take care of the infection. We had discussed tea tree oil before because of its anti fungal, anti bacterial, anti viral properties and I thought it could possibly take the place of some of the antibiotic prescriptions she used so often.

Later in the day I smelled the strong scent of tea tree oil and I kept hearing the question, “What’s that smell?” Deb came into my office and we had a good laugh because she had spilled half the bottle of tea tree oil when she was changing her band aid but she didn’t want anyone to know that the strong smell was coming from her cubicle and anyway her finger was feeling a lot better. I told her that her secret was safe with me.


This is the last in a series of three blogs discussing techniques for using essential oils for aromatherapy. So far, we have talked about body methods and water methods for using essential oils. Today, I’m going to talk about ways to use them throughout a room.

Room Techniques

  • Candles – use 1-2 drops.  Light the candle and when the wax starts to melt, add the oils to the melted wax. Be careful not to get the oils on the wick because they are inflammable.
  • Diffusers – use 1-6 drops. Diffusers are specifically made for use with essential oils. There are many different kinds of diffusers and they can be heated by electricity or by candle flame. Be sure the bowl part of the diffuser is made of non-porous material so that it can be wiped clean before a different essential oil is used in it. The main idea is that the bowl is heated by the heat source allowing the essential oil molecules to be released into the air.
  • Light bulbs – 1-2 drops. Heat from light bulbs can release essential oil molecules into the air. You can put the essential oil directly on the light bulb before you turn it on or you can use a light bulb ring. Do not put the essential oil on a bulb that is hot because the oils are inflammable. Light bulb rings only work on the bulb type of light bulbs. They do not work on the new coiled, energy-saving type bulbs. Make sure the light bulb ring fits on your bulb before you add the oils.
  • Humidifiers – 1-9 drops. Add the essential oil to the water. Eucalyptus would work well for humidifiers because it is antiseptic and antibiotic.
  • Radiators – 1-9 drops. Add the essential oil to a cotton ball and place it by the pipe or somewhere that puts it in contact with the heat.
  • Room sprays – 4 -8 drops per 1 cup water. Use a new plant sprayer  and add warm (not boiling) water, add the essential oil and shake well before using. You can spray the mist into the air or on the carpets, curtains, and furniture. Do not let the water fall on good wood.
  • Water bowls – 1-9 drops. Pour boiling water into a bowl and add the essential oil. Close doors and windows and allow 5 minutes for the aroma to fill the room.
  • Wood fires – 1 drop per log. Use cypress, pine, sandalwood, or cedarwood essential oils. Put 1 drop on each log and let it soak for 30 minutes before using. The oil will be effective on the log for a long time so you can prepare logs in advance and use one essential oil log per fire.


Yesterday we talked about some body methods you can use to get the maximum effect from your essential oils. Today let’s talk about a different technique.

Water Techniques

  • Baths – use a maximum of 8 drops of essential oils in the bath or the amount directed for use in a particular recipe. First, close the bathroom door and run the bath, then add the essential oil and swish the water around. Soak in the tub for at least ten minutes while relaxing and breathing deeply. You can dilute the essential oils in a carrier oil before adding it to the water to help your skin feel silky smooth while also relaxing your body.
  • Bidet – use 2 – 3 drops of essential oil diluted in 1 teaspoon carrier oil. Run warm water from the bidet or from the tap, add the essential oil and swish it around so the oils don’t irritate mucous membranes.
  • Douche – only use this method if you are under the care of a naturopath. Add the essential oil to boiled and cooled water from the tap or warmed, bottled spring water. Shake the douche thoroughly before using.
  • Jacuzzi – use 3 drops per person using the jacuzzi.
  • Sauna – use 2 drops per 2 1/2 cups of water. Use eucalyptus, tea tree or pine essential oils. Mix the essential oils in the water  and throw it onto the heat source as usual. Only use one of these three oils because they are the only ones that enter the body with inhalation and exit by perspiration. All three oils are very beneficial as cleansers and detoxifiers.
  • Shower – as directed or use a maximum  of 8 drops essential oil. First, wash as usual in the shower. Then add the essential oil to your washcloth or sponge and rub it over your body quickly as you stand under the running water. Deeply breathe in the aromatic steam.
  • Sitz bath – as directed in your recipe or 2-3 drops. Run a bath to hip level or use a bowl or pan that is big enough for you to lower your behind into it. Add your essential oil and swish thoroughly so the oils don’t irritate your delicate mucous membranes.
  • Hand bath – use 2-4 drops of essential oil – soak the hands for a maximum of 10 minutes in a bowl of warm water.
  • Foot bath – as directed in your recipe or 2-6 drops. Soak your feet for twenty minutes in a bowl of warm water.


Essential oils can be used in various ways and today we’re going to discuss body techniques which are excellent methods to incorporate essential oils into your life.

Body Techniques

  • Perfume – dissolve your essential oils (the strength is up to you) in a light carrier oil and apply to the body as you would perfume.
  • Tissue or handkerchief – apply 1 drop and sniff as needed.
  • Inhaled as a Vapor – use 2-3 drops  of essential oils. Pour hot water into a bowl, add the oil, cover your head with a towel and lean over the bowl with your face about 10 inches away and with your eyes closed. Breath deeply through your nose for 1 to 3 minutes, take a break and do it again as needed or until the water cools.
  • Massage oil –  use a maximum of 5 drops to each teaspoon of carrier oil or as directed in a particular recipe. Purchase a brown glass bottle and measure out your base oil. You can use sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, grapeseed oil, shea oil, coconut oil, etc. Add the essential oil and blend it into the carrier oil by turning the bottle upside down several times and then rolling the bottle briskly between your hands. You only need about a teaspoon of this mixture poured into the palm of your hand to massage the whole body.

We will continue this blog this week with two other techniques for using essential oils.


Trembling that is not related to a physical ailment like Parkinson’s disease can be helped with aromatherapy. I remember my Uncle Albert’s hands were always trembling, probably because he was an over the road truck driver. I bet this treatment would have helped him, had I known about it then. Yesterday, my husband did the yard trimming with a weed eater and we have a large corner lot so there was a lot of trimming to be done. When he came in, his hands and arms were trembling noticeably so I rubbed his body with the following essential oils: 2 drops of narcissus, 4 drops of nutmeg and 2 drops of lemon diluted in 2 teaspoons of sweet almond oil.

Since it was his hands and arms that were trembling, I rubbed the oil over his right arm, across his chest, down the other arm and over both hands. Within two to three hours, the trembling had lessened significantly. You can use the same treatment again within six hours if needed.  If the trembling is in the lower part of your body, rub the oil (use about the size of a quarter in the palm of your hand) over your lower back, hips, legs, and feet. You may need help with this part, but you should also rub it all down your spine and about a hands width on either side of your spine. If you don’t have anyone to help, just get as much of your spine as possible. Narcissus essential oil is very expensive and many places don’t carry it so if you can’t find it or don’t want to pay so much for the little amount you need to use, you can use chamomile essential oil instead. It is much more reasonably priced.

 


Help for Dry Skin

Author: Dr. Larita
08/01/2011

Dry skin is a condition which can usually be treated with emollients or moisturizing creams. It mostly occurs  on the legs, arms, the sides of the abdomen and thighs. The symptoms most associated with dry skin are the visible peeling of the outer skin layer, itching and cracks in the skin.

If you have dry or itchy skin, avoid using harsh soaps, antiperspirants,  hot baths or anything else that removes your natural oils. Skin dryness and itchiness is worse when the humidity is low and you should definitely avoid stress, too much exposure to the sun, and smoking or secondhand smoke. There are several natural soaps that are gentle on the skin and can be used daily. In addition to using a more gentle soap, help retain the moisture in your skin by using a good moisturizing product.

If you are confused about whether to use an ointment, a lotion or a cream to relieve your dry skin you should know that these terms describe the way skin care products are prepared. Ointments are prepared using oil and may stay on your skin longer but many people don’t like them because they are  greasy and don’t soak into the skin. Creams are less oily than ointments and can be made from natural products so they do soak into the skin easily. Lotions are water-based and get absorbed into the skin quickly, causing instant, but not long-lasting, relief. For longer-lasting relief, choose ointments or creams.

 


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